KitchenAid induction cooktop service manual

In preparation for a future post in which I do some failure analysis on my KitchenAid KICU509XBL induction cooktop, I dug up the service manual I had laying in one of my document drawers and have scanned it into a PDF. Download the PDF file here.

Since Googling for the cooktop’s error/failure codes didn’t turn up anything useful, I’ll post them here so that people can find it more easily (note that I’ve paraphrased it from what’s listed in the PDF itself):

Failure types:

  1. Power control board: Affects only one burner, with the rest remaining functional.
  2. Usually from the power control board, but could be some exceptions: Affects all burners associated with that control board, but any burners that aren’t using said board will still work.
  3. User interface board: Entire cooktop will be unusable.

Error codes:

  • F12: Type 1 – Insufficient current to a burner’s electromagnetic coil.
  • F21: Type 2 – Mains power supply frequency is out of range.
  • F25: Type 2 – Cooling fan is stuck or dead. The specific fan that has failed can be determined by which side the F25 error code is appearing on the user interface board.
  • F36, F37: Type 1 – A burner’s temperature sensor has failed.
  • F40: Type 1 or Type 2 – Power control board has failed.
  • F42: Type 2 – Mains power supply voltage has a problem, perhaps an open fuse on the EMI filter/mains input board.
  • F47: Type 2 – User interface board cannot communicate with the power control board, and/or its fuse is blown. (This failure code is what appeared on my particular cooktop.)
  • F56: Type 3 – The configuration data on the cooktop’s user interface board EEPROM is invalid.
  • F58: Type 2 – The configuration data on the cooktop’s power control board EEPROM is invalid.
  • F60: Type 3 – User interface board has failed.
  • F61: Type 2 – Power control board has failed, likely because it is not receiving enough voltage.
  • C81, C82: Type 2 – Cooktop is overheating.

EDIT (November 6, 2015): The F47 code, in my case, was because the power control board (which is responsible for driving the induction coils to heat up the cookware) had short-circuited somehow. Either way, it burnt out all of the transistors and the diode bridge, which then caused its fuse to blow, and at one point it tripped the main breaker in the house.

I suspect it was caused by using the largest element (the rear right burner) on the Boost/P setting, which overloaded the electronics and caused them to fail dramatically. After getting the board replaced (twice), KitchenAid said they do know about this issue to some extent, and repaired our cooktop free-of-charge despite being out of warranty for several months.

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