Performing safer AC line voltage measurements using isolated amplifiers

DISCLAIMER: AC line (mains) voltage is not something to be taken lightly! Attempting to safely handle line voltages while minimizing the risk of harmful or fatal electric shock is the main motivator for me to design and build this circuit. However, I am no electronics engineer and I definitely have no formal training on international standards pertaining to high-voltage safety. I accept no responsibility, direct or indirect, for any damages that may occur if you attempt to make this circuit yourself, including personal harm or property damage. Additionally, there is no warranty or guarantee, express or implied, on any content pertaining to this blog post (or any other posts).

Back in mid-2017 I won a Keysight DSOX1102G digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), a piece of equipment long on my wish list but never acquired until then. One thing I’ve wanted to be able to measure with an oscilloscope for a long time was the waveform of the AC utility (in other words, the wall outlet). However, doing so presents a very real risk of blowing equipment up or shocking yourself (and possibly other people). In order to prevent this, I needed a way to perform measurements on the AC line without being directly connected to it; in other words, I need galvanic isolation.
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Gaining access to the Windows CE desktop (and Doom!) on the Keysight DSOX1102G Oscilloscope

As seen on Hackaday!

TL;DR – Yes, the Keysight 1000 X-Series oscilloscope runs Doom! The journey getting there wasn’t easy, though.

The oscilloscope is one piece of equipment that any self-respecting electronics enthusiast should have. In short, oscilloscopes let you view the electronic waveforms of a circuit, and digital storage oscilloscopes (DSOs) are especially useful since they can reveal infrequent glitches on signals that an analog oscilloscope or a multimeter wouldn’t pick up.

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Keysight DSOX1102G oscilloscope

The subject of my blog post is the DSOX1102G from Keysight Technologies (formerly Agilent), which is part of their low-end offerings that still offer very good value compared to their competitors. As with most of their oscilloscope offerings, they run an embedded operating system called Windows Embedded CE 6.0 (AKA Windows CE or WinCE), but as with most WinCE applications, you almost never see the Windows interface since it’s hidden behind a custom user interface.

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