Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 4)

“It’s been a long time… How have you been?”

It’s been almost a year since I started my discharge test of the Kentli PH5 Li-ion AA battery, and the battery has lost almost 40% of its capacity due to self-discharge.

The discharge curve has gotten a lot less… linear since the last time I posted a self-discharge update. The battery is down to 62% state-of-charge, and its voltage has dropped down to 3.89 volts. Still, there’s a lot of time left until this battery reaches empty… but when?

I’m no statistician, but doing a linear extrapolation in Excel gives an approximate end date of January 2018, and the SLOPE() function in Excel gives me an average drop of 0.111%/day. Of course, this can easily change over the course of this test, but only time will tell…

HDQ Utility version 0.96 now available!

Whew, I’ve been working on this version for quite a while. With the helpful feedback of many people that have tried my software, I’ve made a large number of improvements to the software; of course, there are plenty of features that aren’t implemented yet, but are being worked on.

More information about how this utility works can be found here.

Download HDQ Utility v0.96 here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/pf0vszgfei7s8ly/HDQ%20Utility%200.96.zip?dl=0

Updates

  • (Major improvement!) Improved HDQ logging functionality (logs are now saved to a separate file instead of being overwritten).
    • Example: “HDQ Log (2015-10-26 at 19.02.50) – HDQ Utility v0.96.txt”
  • Improved HDQ communication (HDQ breaks no longer require the serial port to be opened more than once, and HDQ no-response timeouts are decreased from 0.5 to 0.3 seconds.
  • Reworded certain error messages for clarity.
    • Example: “Communication error: Cannot read byte from address 0x02 (No response from device).” 
  • Renamed file ‘config.txt’ to ‘Config – COM Port.txt’ for clarity.
  • Improved state-of-health warnings by making them non-modal (they do not require the user to dismiss the message).
  • Added more notifications for unidentified and uninitialized batteries. (Uninitialized batteries are determined by a FULL ACCESS security state, with Impedance Track disabled.)
  • Fixed invalid device name and maximum load current readings for v5.02/sn27545-A4 based batteries (e.g. iPhone 6, 6+…).
  • Added time-to-full readings (for firmware older than v2.24).
  • Improved error-checking for device identification (it will display a notice that the tool may need to be restarted).
  • Updated DingoLib UI library to auto-resize window to 0.9x display resolution for improved readability on larger monitors.

To-Do

  • Create a dedicated section on my blog for the HDQ Utility.
  • Create a user’s manual describing the parameters displayed by the program (in particular, the Advanced Battery Information section).
  • Improve data logging functionality by saving logs to a subdirectory instead of the program’s root to decrease file clutter.
  • Improve error-checking for commands (retry reads if one or more bytes are not received from the device).
  • Add error statistics indicating how many communication errors occurred during data collection.
  • Improve support for older (older than v1.25) firmware.
  • Improve support for v5.02/sn27545-A4 devices (make use of advanced commands available in this firmware version).
  • Add support for restarting of data collection without having to re-execute the program.
  • Add Data Flash memory functions to allow for readout of advanced configuration, serial number, lifetime/black-box data, etc.
  • Rewrite this program in something that’s not LabWindows/CVI… also, use of a GUI rather than a non-console text UI.

Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 3)

Aw what, it’s October already? So much for having another blog post in September…
But anyway, “more months, more data!™”

The voltage of the PH5 has dropped down to 4.093 volts as of today (October 1st, 2015), and its State of Charge is now 93%. There’s just enough data to guess the discharge rate of the PH5: with the currently logged data, the PH5 self discharges at approximately 0.103%/day. At this rate, the cell should last years before finally reaching zero. Looks like this will be a very, very long term test…

(At least that would give me more time to procrastinate write blog posts.)

Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 2)

After my first self-discharge analysis of the Kentli PH5 Li-ion AA battery, I have collected another month’s worth of data.

The battery’s voltage drop has been surprisingly linear. Although I didn’t get the exact day when the bq27621-G1’s State of Charge readout dropped to 99%, it is quite clear that the state of charge is dropping with a fairly steep curve now. That said, because the battery’s voltage is still far away from the ‘flat region’ of the discharge curve, it is difficult to determine when the battery will discharge itself completely at this time.

Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 1)

As an extension to my previous performance analysis of Kentli’s PH5 Li-ion AA battery, I fully charged an unused PH5 and left it on my desk to self-discharge. Every now and then, a Texas Instruments bq27621-G1 fuel gauge is hooked up to the Li-ion battery terminals (in the case of the PH5, the recessed ring around the 1.5V terminal) and the bq27621’s default settings are used to measure the voltage and state of charge.

I started this test on June 18th, 2015 and will keep taking occasional measurements until the protection IC in the PH5 shuts down.

Since the 18th, the voltage dropped from 4.216 volts down to 4.192 volts as of July 6, 2015; the bq27621’s State of Charge reading remains at 100% for the time being. The voltage drop has been fairly linear so far, but I expect it to taper off as the battery discharges to the Li-ion cell’s “flat region”, and only after that do I expect the cell’s voltage to decline more rapidly.

(Day 2 of 4) Mini-Ramble: Dallas! TI! Batteries!

Today was the first day of the actual Texas Instruments Battery Management Systems event. To my surprise, a couple hundred of people showed up from TI employees, a lot of customers (representatives from various companies like Bose, Google, and many others), and me as well. 🙂

The first day was a basic but still detailed introduction to the inner workings of Li-Ion technology as well as its limitations, failure modes (the gas coming from a Li-Po [lithium-ion polymer] cell contains carbon monoxide, hydrogen and a bunch of other gases), with this leading towards battery fuel gauges and why just measuring the voltage is not enough to accurately determine how full a battery is.

The day ended with a lab showcasing TI’s new Gauge Development Kit (GDK), which, in layman’s terms, is a “battery lab on a board”. It includes PC communication hardware, an adjustable charger, adjustable load and an on-board fuel gauge (but it’s set to use an external fuel gauge by default). I even got a chance to talk the TI battery management team, and even had a dinner with a few key TI guys including the one who made THE design for the GDK.

Looking inside a (fake) iPhone 5S battery

Considering how popular the iPhone is, there’s always going to be some counterfeits out there. I’ve been out buying various iPhone batteries to build a database of each generation’s characteristics, but one model has eluded me so far: the iPhone 5S. The iPhone 5C’s battery that I bought appears to be genuine (but with its own issues), but none of the iPhone 5S batteries I’ve bought so far (4 of them at the time of writing this blog post) were genuine. All of these fakes look like a genuine battery at first glance, but all of them share a few common traits.

Battery teardown

The fake battery sports the usual iPhone battery information, complete with some dot-matrix printed data and a data-matrix barcode. It’s labeled with a capacity of 1560 mAh and 3.8 volts nominal voltage.

Comparison between real and fake iPhone 5S battery

Comparison between real and fake iPhone 5S battery

The connector itself has two points for soldering the connector to provide durability. However, with the fake batteries, they are not soldered down. The two spots on the ends of the connectors are dark with a small point visible inside it (that point is the reinforcement pin on the connector). If this connector is installed in an iPhone, it will probably not come out without either damaging the battery’s connector, or worse, leave the plastic connector piece inside the phone, requiring tweezers to remove.

Connector lifted off with a hobby knife

Connector lifted off with a hobby knife

iPhone 5S and 5C battery pinout

iPhone 5S and 5C battery pinout

Removing the black protective tape reveals an iPhone 4 battery fuel gauge board. The connector is soldered to this board, with four solder points visible.

iPhone 4 battery PCB with soldered-on flat flex connector

iPhone 4 battery PCB with soldered-on flat flex connector

Pulling out the PCB  reveals another characteristic of these fake batteries: the positive terminal is cut short, with another metal section being clumsily spot-welded to the stub on the cell.

Note how the battery tab is poorly welded to the PCB.

Note how the battery tab is poorly welded to the PCB.

Battery fuel gauge data

The battery fuel gauge requires proper programming to accurately indicate the battery’s charge status. Because of this, each iPhone battery generation has its own specific configuration.

The fake iPhone battery retains the programming for the iPhone 4’s battery, which is a designed capacity of 1420 mAh, using a bq27541 fuel gauge running version 1.25 firmware. The data inside it is often that of a used/recycled battery as well.

This data can be (partially) read out directly from the iPhone with a tool such as iBackupBot, but more data can be read if the battery is read with another tool. I have the EV2400 from Texas Instruments to read this out on a PC, but this data can be read out with a USB-to-TTL serial port, a logic gate (a logic inverter) and a small MOSFET transistor.

I created a small tool that uses this circuit to interface with the fuel gauge and read out its data. Check it out here.

Using my tool, this is the report for one of these fake batteries. Note how it is identified as an iPhone 4 battery. Don’t be fooled by the calculated state of health. It’s not accurate for this battery as the fuel gauge still thinks it’s still inside an iPhone 4 battery pack.


**** START OF HDQ BATTERY LOG REPORT ****
HDQ Gas Gauge Readout Tool version 0.9 by Jason Gin
Date: 9/30/2014
Time: 0:52:24
Serial port: COM26

Battery Identification
========================
DEVICE_TYPE = 0x0541, FW_VERSION = 0x0125, DESIGN_CAPACITY = 1420 mAh
Battery's configuration matches that of a standard iPhone 4 battery.

Basic Battery Information
===========================
Device = bq27541 v.1.25, hardware rev. 0x00B5, data-flash rev. 0x0000
Voltage = 3804 mV
Current = 0 mA
Power = 0 mW
State of charge = 45%
Reported state of health = 0%
Calculated state of health = 99.3%
Cycle count = 14 times
Time to empty = N/A (not discharging)
Temperature = 27.9 °C (80.3 °F) (3009 raw)
Designed capacity = 1420 mAh
Heavy load capacity = 628/1410 mAh
Light load capacity = 673/1455 mAh

Advanced Battery Information
==============================
Capacity discharged = 0 mAh
Depth of discharge at last OCV update = ~778 mAh (8768 raw)
Maximum load current = -200 mA
Impedance Track chemistry ID = 0x0163
Reset count = 11 times

Flags = 0x0180
Flag interpretation:
* Fast charging allowed
* Good OCV measurement taken
* Not discharging

Control Status = 0x6219
Control Status interpretation:
* SEALED security state
* SLEEP power mode
* Constant-power gauging
* Qmax update voltage NOT OK (Or in relax mode)
* Impedance Track enabled

Pack Configuration = 0x8931
Pack Configuration interpretation:
* No-load reserve capacity compensation enabled
* IWAKE, RSNS1, RSNS0 = 0x1
* SLEEP mode enabled
* Remaining Capacity is forced to Full Charge Capacity at end of charge
* Temperature sensor: External thermistor

Device name length = 7 bytes
Device name: bq27541

**** END OF HDQ BATTERY LOG REPORT ****