Quick Review: Littelfuse Smart Glow automotive fuse

2015-05-09 16.29.34It Glows when it Blows! [add obligatory Michael Scott line here]

(I’m sorry. I couldn’t help myself.)

Okay, now that the lowbrow humor has been dealt with, I had to replace a car fuse because of a shorted 12-volt power socket. Luckily, I was able to replace the fuse without the circuit blowing again; however, I had used the only spare fuse in the fuse box and needed to buy some more in case the fault was to recur. Browsing my local Canadian Tire, I stumbled upon a pack of fuses that allowed for a visual check for blown fuses by simply turning on the ignition: the Littelfuse Smart Glow fuse. A 36-pack of these fuses cost about $35 Canadian, making them a bit pricier than their non-illuminated counterparts.

Construction

Closeup of fuse, LED and resistor

Closeup of fuse, LED and resistor

The Smart Glow fuse is comprised of three main components: the actual fuse (which is really just a regular automotive fuse), a 360-ohm resistor, and a dual red LED package with the diodes in inverse parallel to allow for the fuse to glow regardless of orientation. The LEDs and resistors are affixed to the fuse body using various epoxies: an opaque red epoxy to glue the components down, a conductive silver-filled epoxy to provide an electrical connection without soldering, and a clear epoxy to protect the components from damage; the fuse amperage is re-printed on top of the protective epoxy coating since the resistor and LED obscure the original fuse’s markings.

Schematic of Littelfuse Smart Glow fuse

Schematic of Littelfuse Smart Glow fuse

Performance

Simply put, this acts like any other automotive fuse would. The only difference is that the LED will illuminate if the fuse is blown, and sufficient load is still present in the circuit to provide enough current for the LED to act as a fault indicator.

Fuse blown and LED indicator lit with 5 volts

Fuse blown and LED indicator lit with 5 volts

When testing the fuse’s brightness, I found it to be quite noticeable at 5 volts and almost blindingly bright when run at 14.4 volts (the approximate charging voltage for a 12-volt car battery).

Simulation of LED indicator

Simulation of LED indicator

Running this circuit through a simulator, the LED has almost 35 mA of current running through it. Given how LEDs are typically rated for a maximum of 20 mA, this LED is not going to last long; that said, it shouldn’t need to run for a long time as the LED’s only purpose is to notify the user that the fuse needs to be replaced (and at that point the fuse and its indicator will be disposed of anyway).

Conclusion

Yes, it glows when it blows; I have nothing more to add.

(The same could be said for Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, but he’s a non-electronic entity and is therefore outside the scope of this blog. :P)

Teardown/review of Silicon Power 8GB 200x CompactFlash memory card

Hooray for nice hand-me-down SLR cameras! I finally have a better camera than the one built into my (now ancient) Samsung Galaxy S II that I use for pictures on this blog. The camera, a Canon EOS 50D, had an 8GB CompactFlash card that I was preparing to erase and reuse, and had problems trying to read out the card’s contents; a few stubborn files would refuse to copy and Explorer would simply hang until I restarted the program or unplugged the card. Additionally, when using my Hard Disk Sentinel program to do a surface scan, it too would freeze when reading a certain sector on the card.

Instead of using a USB-to-CompactFlash adapter (I could not find my card reader and have not seen it for over a year now, come to think of it) I used a CompactFlash-to-PATA adapter, then a PATA-to-SATA adapter so I could directly hook up the card to my computer. In addition to having greater theoretical throughput, it allows me to view the S.M.A.R.T. diagnostic data that the card provides.

Memory card issues and performance

The diagnostic information doesn’t really provide any insight into the health of the card; none of the S.M.A.R.T. attributes are listed as critical, and many of them are listed as vendor-specific. Oh well, at least it gave me some sort of information…

After finding a copy of the card’s contents on my home server (I seem to have previously backed up the card before the corruption occurred but didn’t recall doing so until I had raked through some of my archives), I decided I’d do a full card erase and see if it would cause the card to be usable again. I called up the Surface Test in Hard Disk Sentinel and used its surface-write tool to erase the user-accessible area of the card. A few blocks seemed to write dramatically slower than the rest and repeated write tests did not resolve their sluggishness; I call shenanigans with the memory card’s controller and its reluctance in reallocating problematic sectors…

The card itself isn’t very fast. The sequential I/O of the card is good enough for casual photography, but I would definitely not use this card in an embedded system that uses a CompactFlash as a sort of mini-SSD; even though it shows up in my system as a hard drive (non-removable), its random I/O is quite sluggish and its random write speed is worse than that of a standard hard disk drive.

Teardown

The card itself is a sandwich of aluminum plates, a plastic case and the PCB assembly that holds the controller, Flash memory and the CompactFlash connector. A hobby knife run under the aluminum plate was able to separate the plate from the plastic body; some glue and a couple clips were the only things holding the card together.

The card’s controller is a Phison PS3006, which sports a PCMCIA (and therefore CompactFlash) interface with True IDE (or plain PATA) support. It contains an 8051 microcontroller core with a few components to assist with interfacing with the Flash memory, such as a hardware ECC (error correction code) engine and a small amount of SRAM for a buffer.

The datasheet for the PS3006 doesn’t provide information on the S.M.A.R.T. attributes, nor does it indicate what type of Flash wear-leveling is provided. Given the controller’s limited computing capabilities, I’m thinking it uses a less-complex but less-reliable form of wear leveling, known as dynamic wear leveling (see Micron’s application note for more information). It’s less capable of dealing with memory wearout, but doesn’t require the computing overhead of static wear leveling (which proper SSD controllers use to keep performance up).

The memory is an Intel 29F32G08AAMD2 device, which is an asynchronous MLC NAND Flash memory chip. There are two installed on this card with another two footprints on the PCB being unpopulated, suggesting that the 16GB version of this card has all four footprints populated.

Conclusion

Given the simplicity of the card, I don’t really have much else to add about this card. Either way, it’s lost my trust with regards to holding my photos. I bought a NOS Disk 16GB CF card from Amazon as well as a SanDisk Extreme 32GB, and plan to use the latter to hold my photos, with the former mainly being a simple curiosity of the construction of a card from a lesser-known manufacturer. Hopefully those will also provide S.M.A.R.T. data, as I prefer Flash-based storage devices with some sort of S.M.A.R.T. data capability. (Is it an insatiable thirst for knowledge? A means of doing regular ‘check-ups’ on my storage device? Probably the latter, but maaayyyybe the former as well. 🙂 )

Teardown of Kentli PH5 1.5 V Li-Ion AA battery

June 17, 2015 – Performance analysis/review HERE!

After having an entire month of dormancy on this blog, I’m finally beginning to cross off the blog posts on my “Pending” list.

Last year, I made a blog post talking about Kentli’s lithium-ion based AA battery that has an internal 1.5 volt regulator. The first order never arrived, and the second one had arrived a few months ago but I never got to actually taking one of the cells apart. That changes today.

Cell overview

The battery itself looks like a regular AA battery, except for the top positive terminal. There’s the familiar ‘nub’ that constitutes the 1.5 volt output, but also has a recessed ring around it that provides a direct connection to the Li-ion cell’s positive connection for charging.

 

After peeling the label, we are met with a plain steel case, save for the end cap that appears to be laser spot-welded. Wanting to take apart the cell with minimal risk of shorting something out inside, I used a small pipe cutter to gently break apart the welded seam. Two revolutions and a satisfying pop sound later, the battery’s guts are revealed.

Battery internals

The PCB that holds the 1.5 volt regulator is inside the end cap, with the rest made up of the Li-ion cell itself. Curiously enough, the cell inside is labeled “PE13430 14F16 2.66wh” which is interesting in more than one way. First of all, the rated energy content of the cell is less than what’s on the outside label (2.66 watt-hours versus 2.8), and the cell inside is actually a Li-ion polymer (sometimes called a “Li-Po” cell) type; I was expecting a standard cylindrical cell inside. Unfortunately, my Google-fu was unable to pull up any data on the cell. I might attempt to do a chemistry identification cycle on the cell and see if TI’s battery database can bring something up.

Battery circuitry

The end cap’s PCB uses a Xysemi XM5232 2.5 A, 1.5 MHz synchronous buck converter to provide the 1.5 volt output. According to the datasheet, it is a fully integrated converter with all the power semiconductor components residing on the chip itself. The converter is rated for 2.5-5.5 volt operation, well within the range of a Li-ion cell. Additionally, it has a rated Iq (quiescent/no-load current) of only 20 microamps. The buck converter’s 2.2 microhenry inductor is magnetically unshielded which may cause some increased EMI (electromagnetic interference) emissions, but I don’t have the equipment to test this.

I was looking around for the battery’s protection circuit, and found it on the flex PCB that surrounds the Li-ion cell. It uses a Xysemi XB6366A protection circuit which, like the buck converter, is a fully-integrated device; there are no external protection MOSFETs for disconnecting the cell from the rest of the circuit.

Performance analysis

December 14, 2015 – After extensive and detailed analysis (148 MB of text files!), I’ve analyzed the battery’s voltage and output capacity, which can be viewed HERE (lots of pretty graphs; check it out!).

The data doesn’t stop there. Over a long, long period of time I’m tracking the battery’s self-discharge as well. Those posts are available here (Part 1), here (Part 2), here (Part 3), and here (Part 4).

Looking inside a (fake) iPhone 5S battery

Considering how popular the iPhone is, there’s always going to be some counterfeits out there. I’ve been out buying various iPhone batteries to build a database of each generation’s characteristics, but one model has eluded me so far: the iPhone 5S. The iPhone 5C’s battery that I bought appears to be genuine (but with its own issues), but none of the iPhone 5S batteries I’ve bought so far (4 of them at the time of writing this blog post) were genuine. All of these fakes look like a genuine battery at first glance, but all of them share a few common traits.

Battery teardown

The fake battery sports the usual iPhone battery information, complete with some dot-matrix printed data and a data-matrix barcode. It’s labeled with a capacity of 1560 mAh and 3.8 volts nominal voltage.

Comparison between real and fake iPhone 5S battery

Comparison between real and fake iPhone 5S battery

The connector itself has two points for soldering the connector to provide durability. However, with the fake batteries, they are not soldered down. The two spots on the ends of the connectors are dark with a small point visible inside it (that point is the reinforcement pin on the connector). If this connector is installed in an iPhone, it will probably not come out without either damaging the battery’s connector, or worse, leave the plastic connector piece inside the phone, requiring tweezers to remove.

Connector lifted off with a hobby knife

Connector lifted off with a hobby knife

iPhone 5S and 5C battery pinout

iPhone 5S and 5C battery pinout

Removing the black protective tape reveals an iPhone 4 battery fuel gauge board. The connector is soldered to this board, with four solder points visible.

iPhone 4 battery PCB with soldered-on flat flex connector

iPhone 4 battery PCB with soldered-on flat flex connector

Pulling out the PCB  reveals another characteristic of these fake batteries: the positive terminal is cut short, with another metal section being clumsily spot-welded to the stub on the cell.

Note how the battery tab is poorly welded to the PCB.

Note how the battery tab is poorly welded to the PCB.

Battery fuel gauge data

The battery fuel gauge requires proper programming to accurately indicate the battery’s charge status. Because of this, each iPhone battery generation has its own specific configuration.

The fake iPhone battery retains the programming for the iPhone 4’s battery, which is a designed capacity of 1420 mAh, using a bq27541 fuel gauge running version 1.25 firmware. The data inside it is often that of a used/recycled battery as well.

This data can be (partially) read out directly from the iPhone with a tool such as iBackupBot, but more data can be read if the battery is read with another tool. I have the EV2400 from Texas Instruments to read this out on a PC, but this data can be read out with a USB-to-TTL serial port, a logic gate (a logic inverter) and a small MOSFET transistor.

I created a small tool that uses this circuit to interface with the fuel gauge and read out its data. Check it out here.

Using my tool, this is the report for one of these fake batteries. Note how it is identified as an iPhone 4 battery. Don’t be fooled by the calculated state of health. It’s not accurate for this battery as the fuel gauge still thinks it’s still inside an iPhone 4 battery pack.


**** START OF HDQ BATTERY LOG REPORT ****
HDQ Gas Gauge Readout Tool version 0.9 by Jason Gin
Date: 9/30/2014
Time: 0:52:24
Serial port: COM26

Battery Identification
========================
DEVICE_TYPE = 0x0541, FW_VERSION = 0x0125, DESIGN_CAPACITY = 1420 mAh
Battery's configuration matches that of a standard iPhone 4 battery.

Basic Battery Information
===========================
Device = bq27541 v.1.25, hardware rev. 0x00B5, data-flash rev. 0x0000
Voltage = 3804 mV
Current = 0 mA
Power = 0 mW
State of charge = 45%
Reported state of health = 0%
Calculated state of health = 99.3%
Cycle count = 14 times
Time to empty = N/A (not discharging)
Temperature = 27.9 °C (80.3 °F) (3009 raw)
Designed capacity = 1420 mAh
Heavy load capacity = 628/1410 mAh
Light load capacity = 673/1455 mAh

Advanced Battery Information
==============================
Capacity discharged = 0 mAh
Depth of discharge at last OCV update = ~778 mAh (8768 raw)
Maximum load current = -200 mA
Impedance Track chemistry ID = 0x0163
Reset count = 11 times

Flags = 0x0180
Flag interpretation:
* Fast charging allowed
* Good OCV measurement taken
* Not discharging

Control Status = 0x6219
Control Status interpretation:
* SEALED security state
* SLEEP power mode
* Constant-power gauging
* Qmax update voltage NOT OK (Or in relax mode)
* Impedance Track enabled

Pack Configuration = 0x8931
Pack Configuration interpretation:
* No-load reserve capacity compensation enabled
* IWAKE, RSNS1, RSNS0 = 0x1
* SLEEP mode enabled
* Remaining Capacity is forced to Full Charge Capacity at end of charge
* Temperature sensor: External thermistor

Device name length = 7 bytes
Device name: bq27541

**** END OF HDQ BATTERY LOG REPORT ****

Looking inside an iPhone 5 battery

In the wake of my previous teardowns of the iPhone 4 and 4S batteries, I went onto eBay and Amazon (realizing that they finally have Amazon Prime student rates up in Canada) and bought a few iPhone 5 and 5S batteries. Although I was primarily interested in trying to get the gas gauge information out of the batteries, I had a secondary reason. The Nexxtech Slim Power Bank (a subject of a separate blog post) uses a pair of 3.8-volt Li-ion polymer batteries, and they seemed to be be suspiciously similar in size to what is used in the iPhone 5. But enough of that, we’re here for the iPhone 5 battery in particular!

Battery Casing

The iPhone 5 battery measures 3.7 mm in thickness, 3.2 cm in width and 9.1 cm in length. This particular model, made by Sony, has a model ID of US373291H, with the six digits corresponding to the cell’s dimensions. This cell has a labeled capacity of 1440 mAh at a nominal 3.8 volts, with a maximum charge voltage of 4.3 volts. I tried to read the data matrix barcode on the cell but my barcode scanning app on my phone refused to recognize it. I might try to scan and sharpen the barcode later but it’s not something that’s of a high priority to me.

Battery Teardown and Pinout

The board itself is rather interesting. The protection MOSFETs used to switch the battery’s power are chip-scale packages and are glued down with epoxy, same with the gas gauge itself. This means that I can’t easily replace it with a rework station if the need arises. The board includes the gas gauge, thermistors, protection circuitry and still has room for a polyfuse for extra over-current protection.

iPhone 5 battery PCB layout

iPhone 5 battery PCB layout

The pinout of the iPhone 5 battery is pretty much the same as of the iPhone 4 and 4S. You have Pack-, NTC Thermistor, HDQ and Pack+. In this particular model of battery, the gas gauge is a bq27545 (labeled SN27545), but has basically the same feature set as the iPhone 4/4S’ bq27541. With this information, I soldered to the small terminals on the connector (the actual connectors for this battery haven’t arrived yet since it takes so long to receive items from China on eBay), and hooked it up to my trusty Texas Instruments EV2400 box.

iPhone 5 battery pinout

iPhone 5 battery pinout

Battery Data

iphone 5 firmware versionAnd once again, we’re presented with an obscure firmware revision. The latest bq27545-G1 firmware is only version 2.24, but this chip has version 3.10. After forcing GaugeStudio to accept this gauge as a -G1 version, we’re once again presented with a sealed chip. Let’s try to unseal it with the default key…

... aaaaand nope. No dice with 0x36720414, unlike last time.

Nope. No dice with 0x36720414, unlike last time.

… and I get the dreaded “Unseal Key” prompt. Cue the dramatic Darth Vader “NOOOOO” here. Maybe Apple read my previous post and decided to change the default keys this time (Hey Apple, if you read this, make the iPhone 6’s gas gauge have the default keys again)! This means that not only can I not access any of the juicy details of this battery, but I cannot update its firmware to a more… conventional version either. I could try brute-forcing it, but trying to hack a key with a 32-bit address space over a 7 kbps bus… uh, no. That’s not going to happen. I’d probably have better luck reverse-engineering Apple’s battery code but I doubt they have any facility to do in-system firmware updates for the gas gauge.

Data captured from GaugeStudio

Data captured from GaugeStudio

Now for some rather… interesting details of what we can access. The design capacity of this battery, according to the gas gauge, is 1430 mAh, same as the iPhone 4S and also 100 mAh less than what’s written on the label. That, and the full charge capacity of this battery is 1397 mAh out of the gate. The gauge seems to be an insomniac (it won’t enter Sleep mode even when the battery is not hooked up to any load), and it seems to have less features despite having a higher firmware version (I’m sure the internal temperature isn’t 131 degrees C…), and the Pack Configuration register doesn’t bring up any sensible data.

Battery… conspiracy?

One thing that I haven’t confirmed is whether or not this battery had been tampered with before I received it. I bought this particular battery from eBay and it was listed as new. It had some adhesive residue but no obvious sign of being peeled off from another iPhone. The cycle count is set to 1, and because the gas gauge is sealed, I can’t read any other data like the lifetime data logs. There is a chance that this battery isn’t new and that the seller had somehow changed the data memory and sealed the chip with a non-default key, but I need to wait until some other batteries arrive in the mail and perhaps try reading out batteries taken out directly from some iPhone 5s. Until then, it’s only speculation as to why this chip is sealed with a different key.

The next victims specimens: an iPhone 5S battery, a “new” iPhone 4 battery, and an Amazon Kindle battery.

Review, teardown and analysis of Charging Essentials USB wall outlet

(UPDATE: March 2, 2015 – I’ve picked up a pair of the newer tamper-resistant versions of this wall outlet. A review and teardown on that unit is coming up; stay tuned!)
(UPDATE 2: May 29, 2016 – Scratch that on the first tamper-resistant model; it had the same performance as the one mentioned here. Also, Costco has released a 3.1A version of this outlet, and is currently under review.)

About a week ago I bought a set of wall outlets from Costco that integrate two USB charging ports into a standard Decora-type receptacle. It’s marketed to replace your traditional AC adapter, allowing other appliances to be plugged in while charging your portable electronics.

The outlet is made by Omee Electrical Company, but curiously enough this particular model, the OM-USBII, wasn’t listed on their site. The packaging itself bears the name Charging Essentials, with a logo that looks like a USB icon that’s had one Viagra too many. The packaging states that the outlet has:

  • “Two 5VDC 2.1A ports for more efficient charging in less time”
  • “Smarter USB charging with special chip designed to recognize and optimize the charging requirements of your device”
  • “Screw-free wall plate snaps into place for a more clean, modern appearance”

The second note is of particular importance to me. If it’s true, that means it might be using some USB charge port controller like TI’s TPS251x-series chips. But I’m not one to have blind faith in what’s written on the packaging. Let’s rip this sucker apart!

The outlet has a snap-on coverplate which may look sleek but could hamper removal of this outlet later on if needed. I was curious as to why one couldn’t just use a regular screw-on coverplate, and it turns out it’s because the mounting flange doesn’t have any tapped screw holes; you physically can’t use screws on this because the manufacturer didn’t want to go to the effort to make holes that can accept screws!

The casing is held together with four triangle-head screws in a weak attempt to prevent opening of the device. I had a security bit set on hand so this posed no hindrance to me. Upon removing the cover, the outlet seems rather well built. However, after removing the main outlet portion to reveal the AC-DC adapter inside, I quickly rescinded that thought.

The converter seems relatively well-built (at least relative to some crap Chinese power supplies out there). Some thought was put into the safe operation of this device, but there’s almost no isolation between the high and low voltage sides, and the DC side of this adapter is not grounded; the “ground” for the USB ports floats at 60 volts AC with respect to the mains earth pin. The Samxon brand caps are also pretty disappointing.

As for the USB portion of this device, I had to remove some hot glue holding the panel in place. After a few minutes of picking away at the rubbery blob, I was able to pull out the USB ports.

… and I found LIES! DIRTY LIES! There is no USB charge port controller, contrary to what the packaging claims. It just uses a set of voltage dividers to emulate the Apple charger standard, which could break compatibility with some smartphones. Ugh, well let’s put it back together and take a look at it from the performance side of things. At least the USB ports feel pretty solid…

To measure the voltage-current characteristic of the outlet, I rebuilt my bq27510-G3 Li-Ion gas gauge board so it had better handling of high current without affecting my current and voltage measurements. The reason I used this is because the gauge combines a voltmeter and ammeter in one chip, and by using the GaugeStudio software, I could create easy, breezy, beautiful V-I graphs.

Using a Re:load 2 constant-current load, I slowly ramped up the load current while logging the voltage and current data to a CSV file for analysis in Excel.

overall vi graphThis charger’s… okay. It has surprisingly good regulation up to 2.3 amps, but after that point the AC-DC converter basically brickwalls and the voltage plummets to 3 volts. That said, this also means that this outlet is not a set of “two 2.1A USB ports”. You can charge one tablet but you won’t be able to charge a tablet along with another device simultaneously.

Bah, I’ve had it with this wall outlet. Looks like this one’s gonna be returned to Costco in the next few days. This outlet may be adequate for some people, but for me it’s a disappointment.

Pros:

  • Solid USB ports
  • Good voltage stability (up to 2.3 amps, enough to charge ONE tablet)
  • Apple device compatibility

Cons:

  • Annoying coverplate design
  • Does not meet rated current output, will not charge 2 tablets or 1 tablet + another device
  • Does NOT have a “smart charging chip” despite being stated on packaging, some devices (eg. BlackBerry) will refuse to charge from these ports
  • Power supply for USB seems cheap
  • USB port is not grounded – if a short-circuit happens inside the power supply it can be a shock hazard to you

(Part 2 of 2) Microdrive Adventures: Looking into (and butchering) the Hitachi Microdrive and Seagate ST1 CompactFlash hard drives

(Part 1 viewable here)

Content advisory: electronics gore! 😀

refundI sent screenshots from Hard Disk Sentinel to the seller of the microdrives, and they refunded my money but didn’t want the drives back. Even then, it’d probably be a good idea to destroy the drives since re-use of them would be a bit… fraudulent after getting refunded. I decided to throw the drives around to see how well they’d hold up to physical abuse.

The Microdrive died when I whipped it against the concrete floor of my basement, go figure. The impact was strong enough to bend the steel frame but not enough to shatter the glass hard disk inside. Obviously, the disk didn’t spin up or enumerate in Hard Disk Sentinel. Now that the drive’s murder has been accomplished, it’s autopsy time!

The Seagate ST1 was put through a similar treatment, but it died much less gracefully when plugged in. The main controller chip (I think) shorted internally, and after about 15 seconds of being powered up, it released the magic smoke. The board’s plastic liner was melted where the chip shorted out. The drive internals weren’t much different than the Hitachi drives so I didn’t bother taking pictures of the drive’s insides.

After the damage was done, the drives were promptly put in a small plastic bag to be put in an electronics recycle bin.