eMMC Adventures, Episode 3: Building a custom adapter to use cheap eMMC-based 32GB SSD modules

As seen on Hackaday!

While on my quest for more eMMC-based storage devices, I stumbled upon a few devices that piqued my interest: eMMC-based SATA SSDs! I found two models of particular interest: Dell had M.2 modules with a 2.5″ adapter, and HP had custom boards intended for use in cheap laptops (for example, the HP 14-an012nr). Although the former was easier for me to use (but not acquire), I will be focusing on the latter in this blog post.
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Reverse-engineering the Toshiba Tecra R840’s battery interface… the long way

Since the summer I’ve been all about interfacing with smart batteries. All the laptops I’ve had, I’ve deciphered the pinouts for. However, our college-supplied laptops, the Toshiba Tecra R840, has eluded me for over a year. The IT department didn’t allow me to obtain an old battery pack for disassembly (not like I was expecting them to 🙂 ), so instead I looked at disassembling the laptop to find out the interface. The reason I decided to take apart the laptop as opposed to the battery, is that the laptop is generally able to be taken apart and re-assembled without leaving permanent marks; batteries are often ultrasonically welded and can only be opened with brute force or a hot knife.

Laptop bottom cover removed and powered by battery

Laptop bottom cover removed and powered by battery

After removing many screws and popping the bottom of the laptop apart, I looked to the battery connector to find out the pinout.

Close-up of battery connector

Close-up of battery connector

The PCB had an unpopulated spot for some 3-terminal ESD protection diode, and this was a hint that these two pins were what I was looking for. I soldered some wires to the pins and a third ground wire, and attached them to a pin header. I used a logic analyzer to examine the signals (if any) that passed through the connector.

toshiba battery

Logic analyzer trace of initial battery insertion

And I hit pay dirt, or so I thought. I was able to find out that there indeed was communication between the battery and the laptop. However, the fun ends there. Looking closely at the I2C transactions, I could see that the battery wasn’t speaking the normal SBS (Smart Battery System) protocol. Testing with my Texas Instruments EV2400 confirmed that this isn’t a smart battery. It appears that the battery likely only contains an EEPROM for some battery information storage but lacks any real means of gas gauging. That would probably explain why battery life is abysmal on these machines!

Toshiba battery not detected with smart battery hardware/software

Toshiba battery not detected with smart battery hardware/software

I was able to mostly figure out the pinout for the battery, but what has yet to be seen, is which pins provide power to the EEPROM chip, as it seems that it is not powered internally.

Currently known battery pinout

Currently known battery pinout

Sometime later I’ll have to delve further into the contents of the EEPROM, or try and obtain one of these batteries for disassembly. We’ll just have to see.