Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 5)

It’s amazing – 894 days (and counting) have elapsed since the start of my long-term experiment, documenting the real-world self-discharge behavior of the Kentli 1.5V Li-ion AA battery… and it’s still ongoing! How have things fared so far?

Surprisingly, even after spending nearly 30 months on the shelf, there is still 12% capacity left. The voltage has dropped from 4.216 to 3.692 volts according to my bq27621 Li-ion fuel gauge; the State of Charge (SoC) has dropped 50% since my last update.

november 28 2017 stats

The linear end date prediction is holding pretty steady, having changed slightly to an estimated 0% charge date somewhere in February 2018.

On that note, I’m impressed by how much attention this little battery has received, even years after my initial review. Every day I see a handful of views checking out the teardown and performance metrics, and there seems to be hardly any sign that this will change anytime soon. To everyone who stops by to check out my blog posts: thank you! 🙂

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Mini-Ramble: So… WordAds!

I’ve finally done it – I took the plunge and tried to find out if I can enable advertisements on my blog (*gasp*) through the WordAds program – and as it turns out, yes!

Given what I’ve seen online, WordPress has always been vague on one of their acceptance criteria: views per month. They state on their own FAQ that they require “thousands of pageviews each month to earn meaningful revenue”. There were no clear answers from other bloggers either. In my case, I’ve had a paltry 8,000 views/month on average ever since I registered my domain, ripitapart.com (I had over 10,000 views/month when I was using the free WordPress domain). Given that I tend to blog about relatively niche topics (who really cares about battery fuel gauges, anyway?), this is not particularly unexpected; this isn’t helped by the fact I haven’t been posting frequently as of late (so far I have dozens of draft posts, with some that probably won’t be completed as they have essentially gone ‘stale’).

Application for WordAds

I submitted an application request for the WordAds program on November 20, 2017. Immediately after filling out the form I was given an automated message that I was initially declined due to insufficient viewership (but they would keep my request open until I had achieved enough page views per month). However, the next morning I awoke to an email that read “Welcome to WordAds!” – a pretty nice way to start the day. I’m guessing that the number of outstanding applicants were low, and that my content is original enough to warrant acceptance into the WordAds program. Perhaps there is a manual component to reviewing these applications?

So, what about earnings?

Given that it hasn’t even been a week since I was accepted into WordAds, it’s far too early to say how much I’ll actually get out of these advertisements; on that note, since I use WordPress’ Free plan/tier, there were always advertisements on my site (I didn’t get any revenue from those ads, however). Given how most people likely use an ad blocker (myself included), this will further reduce the amount of revenue I can generate from this blog. WordAds will only pay out advertisement revenue when earnings accumulate past $100, which means I won’t actually receive anything until that point… and who knows how long that will be.

Unlike other advertisement platforms, I do not get real-time analytics of ad traffic, and statistics for the month are only updated near the end of the next month (in my case, this means I will not see any information on November’s earnings until the end of December). One common complaint about WordAds is the lack of customization for ads that will be shown; on the flip side, the advertisement system does all the back-end work so I don’t need to lift a finger in that regard.

Your thoughts?

This is the first time I’ve ever tried online traffic advertisements and site monetization, so saying I’m inexperienced in this field is a bit of an understatement. However, I’m curious as to where this will go, and how this will affect my reader base.

What’s your experience with ads on my blog? I’d love to hear your comments on it, especially as time goes on.

Domain Get… again!

Another domain? You betcha!

My blog is now also accessible at http://jasongin.com. There isn’t any real different content if you follow the link; it just links to my normal domain at http://ripitapart.com.

But why another domain?

In a nutshell, it’s for the ability to register a more professional email address for work-related use (think resumes and so on). Coupled with WordPress G Suite integration, this allows me to easily create an email address that is truly unique (since a similarly named Gmail address has already been taken 😛 ).

The cost isn’t too high, about $100 CAD for a year’s worth in subscription fees.

Now, for formal communication, I am reachable at jason.gin@jasongin.com but any other conversation should be directed towards my personal email, ginbot86@gmail.com.

Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 1)

As an extension to my previous performance analysis of Kentli’s PH5 Li-ion AA battery, I fully charged an unused PH5 and left it on my desk to self-discharge. Every now and then, a Texas Instruments bq27621-G1 fuel gauge is hooked up to the Li-ion battery terminals (in the case of the PH5, the recessed ring around the 1.5V terminal) and the bq27621’s default settings are used to measure the voltage and state of charge.

I started this test on June 18th, 2015 and will keep taking occasional measurements until the protection IC in the PH5 shuts down.

Since the 18th, the voltage dropped from 4.216 volts down to 4.192 volts as of July 6, 2015; the bq27621’s State of Charge reading remains at 100% for the time being. The voltage drop has been fairly linear so far, but I expect it to taper off as the battery discharges to the Li-ion cell’s “flat region”, and only after that do I expect the cell’s voltage to decline more rapidly.

Ramble/WordPress auto-post time: 2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

Madison Square Garden can seat 20,000 people for a concert. This blog was viewed about 66,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Madison Square Garden, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Ramble: Flappy Bird crash investigation

Although it’s already been pulled off the iOS App Store and the Google Play Store, I managed to get a copy of the .apk file and decided to play it on my phone. Seeing others’ experiences along with my own, I noticed there is a pattern to how the annoying little birds fly and crash.

Bird-control theory

The bird is controlled by tapping the screen, which causes the bird to move upward shortly before falling down again. Unlike other similar games, the screen needs to be periodically tapped to keep the bird in the air. This is basically pulse-density modulation at work; each tap of the screen causes a rise of a fixed amplitude and duration.

After playing over 200 rounds, I tabulated the data in a giant Excel spreadsheet, documenting the score along with how and where the bird crashed. With this data, I created a bunch of charts showing how and where crashes occur.

Charts

scorescrash typecrash locationscrash proximityBreakdown

From what I’ve collected, the majority of crashes are overshoots (the bird flies too high and hits the pipe), hitting the top pipe either to the left side or in the center. This can be attributed to the bird’s behavior when flying. When the screen is tapped, the bird moves a certain distance upwards but cannot be controlled. If the bird is too close to the pipe, an overshoot will occur and crash the bird.

I created a bunch of statistics in the spreadsheet outlining the most common crash IDs (explained in the picture) and score information (my highest was 34 🙂 )

statsWas this a good way to cure boredom? Probably, but also possibly a bit too much work given the premise of this game.

If you want a copy of the Excel spreadsheet, click the link below.

Flappy Bird Crash Data