Hacking into Windows CE (and Doom) on the Magellan RoadMate 1412 GPS receiver

As seen on Hackaday!

Oh no, I’ve done it again haven’t I?

TL;DR: Just because a device runs Windows CE doesn’t mean it’ll just run Doom without much work.

About a week ago I was perusing some local garage sales, and stumbled upon an old GPS receiver – the Magellan RoadMate 1412. Magellan units are known to run Windows CE, so naturally I had to purchase it and do what needed to be done: run Doom on it. After shelling out $10 CAD for the receiver and its slightly-damaged car charging cord (no mounting bracket, though), it was time to take it home, clean it up, and send it to its Doom… (heh, get it? … I’ll see myself out.)

The Magellan RoadMate 1412 running Doom!

The Magellan RoadMate 1412 running Doom! It wasn’t nearly as easy as I first thought…

Considering that the device runs Windows CE 5.0, I figured that running Doom on it would be a piece of cake once I gain access to the underlying operating system. Should be pretty straightforward… right?

Wrong! Feel free to join me in my adventures in running Doom on a (perhaps excessively) neutered stripped-down Windows CE device.

Stage 1: Power-Up

Turning on the unit wasn’t particularly exciting, although I expected the unit to not work until the internal battery received at least some charge. However, within seconds of me connecting the car charger to it, it powered on with the Magellan logo and a progress bar, before transitioning to the boot logo and the usual “don’t crash your car” warnings that GPS units tend to display on power-up.

 

 

 

Unsurprisingly, the unit still works as a GPS unit, and there’s no immediately apparent way to exit the navigation app and slip out into Windows CE itself. However, after some searching, I found out that plugging in the unit causes it to appear on a computer as a USB drive, with the navigation app’s files all visible as a FAT32-formatted 2-gigabyte volume.

 

 

 

Stage 2: Not-so-Total Command

The navigation app’s files are stored in the “APP” directory, with the executables “Navigator.exe” and “mgnShell.exe” catching my eye in particular. I renamed the Navigator app to “MagNavigator.exe” as to allow a relatively easy revert in case things go wrong, and I copied TotalCommander/CE to replace the original navigation app. Rebooting the receiver didn’t appear to change anything until I dismissed the initial legal warning. Once I closed the notice, I was sent right into TotalCommander/CE, but with no taskbar in sight.

 

 

 

One strange thing I noticed was a distinct lack of icons in the folder list. Scrolling through the “\Windows\” directory revealed some rather disappointing revelations: we have no command prompt, on-screen keyboard, or Explorer shell (therefore, no desktop, Start menu or taskbar).

This meant that running Doom wouldn’t be nearly as easy as it was when I got it running on my Keysight DSOX1102G oscilloscope, as that device still had a (mostly) full Explorer shell and command prompt. Windows .lnk shortcuts failed to work either, causing TotalCommander to just redirect to the system root directory – and forget trying to use batch files! The Explorer components are so absent, third-party apps can’t even display Open or Save dialogs…

This presented a significant roadblock: Chocolate Doom for Windows CE requires command-line arguments. How am I supposed to run this with no Explorer shell or command prompt?!

Stage 3: Getting (Mort)Scripty

Without access to native Windows CE tools, I needed to find a third-party solution to run programs with command-line arguments – maybe some sort of scripting engine.

Enter MortScript. It’s a lightweight yet powerful scripting engine, with a Visual Basic-like syntax. It’s instrumental in making GPS mods like MioPocket possible. (On that note, before this point I wasn’t even aware that MioPocket even existed; I learned that it provides a lot of Windows CE functionality that’s otherwise absent on GPS units like mine, but I’ve come this far – I was determined to forge my own path to Doom.)

 

 

 

I tinkered with the example command syntax and used its Run() command to send the correct command-line arguments for Chocolate Doom: “chocolate-doom.exe -iwad [wad path]“. After running MortScript for the first time to register the .mscr file extension, I was ready to make my script:

# LaunchDoom1.mscr
#########################################
# Chocolate Doom for Windows CE Startup Script by Jason Gin
# Visit: https://ripitapart.com
# Version 1.0 (initial release)
#########################################

# Resource Paths (WAD and executable)
DoomWadPath = "\SDMMC\Fun\chocolate-doom-1.3.0-wince\Doom1.wad"
DoomExePath = "\SDMMC\Fun\chocolate-doom-1.3.0-wince\chocolate-doom.exe"

#########################################

# Step 1: Create required command-line arguments to start Doom:
DoomExeArgs = "-iwad " & DoomWadPath

# Step 2: Run Doom!
# Error checking is performed on whether the WAD file path is valid.
# This assumes that the executable path is valid.
# If it isn't, then nothing happens anyway.

If (FileExists(DoomWadPath))
Run(DoomExePath,DoomExeArgs)
Else
Message ("Error: Unable to find the WAD file at " & DoomWadPath & "!")
EndIf

Stage 4: Doom’d!

After running the script, I declared success: it runs Doom! The window was limited to its lowest supported resolution of 256×200, but running “chocolate-setup.exe” I was able to set it to 320×240 – not great, not terrible. Oh, and it also runs Duke Nukem 3D.

 

 

 

Unlike my previous Doom hack, I wanted to make the window fill the screen but not be in full-screen mode (without any physical buttons, I would otherwise be unable to regain control of the operating system). After some tinkering with the configuration files stored in “\My Documents\.chocolate-doom\chocolate-doom.cfg“, I changed the following settings:

autoadjust_video_settings     0
fullscreen                    0
aspect_ratio_correct          1
screen_width                  480
screen_height                 247

With this adjustment saved, I was able to get a more immersive Doom experience on my GPS receiver.

The Magellan RoadMate 1412 running Doom.

Magellan RoadMate 1412 Runs Doom

Extras

I wanted to see if I could get an external keyboard working on the receiver so I can actually play Doom instead of just letting the on-screen demo do its thing, so I rigged up a mini-USB On-The-Go (USB OTG) cord with a homemade USB B-to-A adapter so I can plug in USB peripherals to the charging port. Unfortunately, it seems that the receiver only supports USB drives, and refuses to work with USB input devices (like mice and keyboards); it doesn’t even work with USB hubs! Oh well, it was worth a try.

 

 

 

Conclusion

As is with many things in life, projects are often much more complicated than it might seem. Just because a certain device runs Windows CE doesn’t mean that all the of the expected components are actually available (after all, it is meant to be a highly modular embedded operating system). However, with the right tools, it can be done – and it keeps the adage of “It Runs Doom!” alive.

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Unboxing and review of SanDisk 64GB microSDXC High Endurance Card

Dashcams: they can be a crucial tool when reconstructing events in a vehicular incident, or a source of entertainment when watching compilations on YouTube. Like any modern device, they generally use SD or microSD cards as their storage medium. However, not all cards are created equal.

Cheaper cards, like SanDisk’s Ultra lineup, use cheaper TLC (triple-level cell) NAND Flash that is ill-suited to the harsh working conditions of a dashcam. Not only does the card have to endure temperature extremes, the constant writes can burn through the Flash’s write cycles in short order. In fact, SanDisk specifically denounces this line of cards for use in continuous-recording applications.

The solution: high-endurance memory cards! These cards (at least in theory) use more durable MLC or even SLC NAND Flash, which can take many more write cycles. I purchased the 64-gigabyte model, the SDSQQNR-064G-G46A.

Unboxing

The card’s packaging isn’t much different than SanDisk’s typical microSD card offerings. The paper-and-plastic package includes a small blister pack that holds the microSD card itself and the full-size SD card adapter, without a carrying case (granted, the memory card is expected to stay inside the dashcam for most of its working life).

The packaging also includes a license key for a 1-year subscription to the RescuePRO data recovery software (although in all honesty, you’d be better off using the free PhotoRec software instead).

Endurance Rating

SanDisk’s lineup of high-endurance memory cards are designed for use in very write-intensive workloads, such as constant video recording.

Unfortunately, the endurance specifications for these cards are (probably intentionally) vague, only providing a set number of hours of video recording. However, we can infer a rating with a little bit of math.

SanDisk’s card packaging defines Full HD video to be 26 Mbps, which is equivalent to 3.25 (binary) megabytes per second. This equates to 11,700 megabytes per hour, or 11.426 gigabytes per hour. With a rating of 5,000 hours at this data rate, we get a specified endurance of 57,128.91 gigabytes written, or 55.79 terabytes written (TBW).

Memory cards, like other block-based storage media, often define capacities with decimal prefixes, whereas computers usually binary. A “64-gigabyte” card is really 59.605 binary gigabytes (“gibibytes“) in capacity, but in this blog post I’m using the Windows notation of gigabytes; that is, calculating in binary but displaying as decimal. 😛

Therefore, we get a final calculated P/E (program-erase) cycle count of… 936 cycles. This is more in line with traditional 2D TLC NAND Flash, so I suspect that this rating is either based on different bitrates, or SanDisk is being really, really conservative in their estimates – or heck, maybe this really is just TLC NAND Flash that’s being configured and/or warrantied differently by SanDisk. As much as I am tempted to remove the epoxy coating that covers the manufacturing test pads in order to get a NAND Flash signature directly, I like having a warranty for at least a few years. Maybe I’ll buy another card to try this on…

Card Information

Using an older laptop with a true SD-compliant slot (most newer ones are just USB card readers internally), I was able to grab the card’s metadata from Linux. These information files are found in /sys/block/mmcblkX/device, where X is usually 0 depending on your host machine. Android used to be able to do this as well, but nowadays it’s not possible without a rooted operating system.

Item Value
CID (Card ID) 035744534836344780ed1bbb9e013100
CSD (Card Specific Data) 400e0032db790001dbd37f800a404000
Manufacturer ID 0x03 (SanDisk)
Manufacture Date January 2019
Device Name SH64G
Firmware Version 0x0
Hardware Revision 0x8

Initial Formatting

The card is formatted as exFAT, with a 16 MB offset (that is, the first 16 MB of the card is unallocated), with an allocation unit size of 128 kilobytes. It uses a very basic MBR (Master Boot Record) partition structure, with the first sector being the bare minimum to be recognized as a valid structure.

Performance

Now that I’ve probably irked some of my readers with my usage of decimal and binary prefixes, it’s time to see how fast this card can go. SanDisk’s own ratings for the card are very brief, citing a sequential read/write speed of 100 and 40 MB/s respectively. It is rated for the V30 Video speed classification, which guarantees a minimum of 30 MB/s sequential writes continuously.

All the tests below were performed on my desktop computer using a FCR-HS4 USB 3.0 reader from Kingston, which is based on the Realtek RTS5321 chipset.

CrystalDiskMark

CrystalDiskMark is the de-facto standard for storage benchmarks. I’m using the 64-bit edition of CDM, version 5.2.0.

I/O Type Read Write
Sequential QD32 91.80 MB/s 60.56 MB/s
Sequential 93.33 MB/s 61.66 MB/s
4K Random QD32 8.319 MB/s
2129.7 IOPS
4.004 MB/s
1025.0 IOPS
4K Random 8.121 MB/s
2079.0 IOPS
3.971 MB/s
1016.6 IOPS

The sequential I/O speeds are on par with a modern microSDXC card, and the IOPS aren’t too shabby either; they exceed the IOPS requirements for the A1 performance class which requires R/W IOPS of 1500 and 500 respectively. This could make this type of card a viable option for other write-heavy environments – this includes single-board computers (SBCs) like the Raspberry Pi, where memory card failures due to excessive writes are common.

ATTO Disk Benchmark

The card’s read/write performance levels off at around the 64-kilobyte mark during testing, showing that operations smaller than this incur a significant performance penalty. This may also be indicative of the internal page and block sizes of the NAND Flash itself.

Hard Disk Sentinel

Hard Disk Sentinel comes with a bunch of disk benchmarking tools, including some to test the entire “surface” of a drive. I used the software’s Surface Test tool to measure the card’s performance before and after filling the drive with data – first with random data, then with all zeroes.

Random Seek Test

The Random Seek Test measures the card’s latency when performing random “seeks”, although more accurately it reads a single sector from a random location.

State Average Latency Minimum Latency Maximum Latency
Empty/Initial (0x00) 360 µs 350 µs 420 µs
Random Fill 600 µs 590 µs 670 µs
Zero Fill 600 µs 590 µs 690 µs

The card initially had about 420 microseconds of latency, but after filling the card with random data, this increased to 670 microseconds. Filling the card with all zeroes again did not improve performance, and his isn’t helped by the fact that SD cards generally lack the ability to “TRIM” unused sectors like SSDs or eMMC chips.

Full Surface Read (or at least an attempt)

This is where things get a bit… interesting. It was around this time that I noticed some performance inconsistencies that didn’t show up on other benchmarks. Although the I/O speeds largely matched what my other benchmarks revealed, I noticed frequent dips below normal, often down to the mid-20 MB/s range! I wasn’t sure that this was necessarily the card’s fault (pauses in read/writes could result in performance degradation on a device if it can’t buffer the writes well enough), or if my card reader/operating system/etc. was responsible.

I decided to hold off on publishing the sequential write test until I get this issue figured out – perhaps it’s worthy of a blog post all on its own…