Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 2)

After my first self-discharge analysis of the Kentli PH5 Li-ion AA battery, I have collected another month’s worth of data.

The battery’s voltage drop has been surprisingly linear. Although I didn’t get the exact day when the bq27621-G1’s State of Charge readout dropped to 99%, it is quite clear that the state of charge is dropping with a fairly steep curve now. That said, because the battery’s voltage is still far away from the ‘flat region’ of the discharge curve, it is difficult to determine when the battery will discharge itself completely at this time.

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Self-discharge test of Kentli PH5 1.5V Li-ion AA (Part 1)

As an extension to my previous performance analysis of Kentli’s PH5 Li-ion AA battery, I fully charged an unused PH5 and left it on my desk to self-discharge. Every now and then, a Texas Instruments bq27621-G1 fuel gauge is hooked up to the Li-ion battery terminals (in the case of the PH5, the recessed ring around the 1.5V terminal) and the bq27621’s default settings are used to measure the voltage and state of charge.

I started this test on June 18th, 2015 and will keep taking occasional measurements until the protection IC in the PH5 shuts down.

Since the 18th, the voltage dropped from 4.216 volts down to 4.192 volts as of July 6, 2015; the bq27621’s State of Charge reading remains at 100% for the time being. The voltage drop has been fairly linear so far, but I expect it to taper off as the battery discharges to the Li-ion cell’s “flat region”, and only after that do I expect the cell’s voltage to decline more rapidly.

Performance analysis/review of Kentli PH5 Li-ion 1.5V AA battery

In my previous blog post, I tore down the Kentli PH5 battery – a Li-ion battery that has an internal 1.5-volt regulator that allows for terrific voltage stability… up to a point. In terms of data collection, so far I have collected 55+ runs of data logs (248 MB of text files!) and still do not quite have all the data I want. As for the data that I do have, I will be disseminating them with as much thoroughness as possible.

Updated (May 1, 2018):

The battery’s self-discharge rate experiment has come to its conclusion – click here to read it.

I forgot to add a diagram of my test setup – here’s a Visio diagram of the hardware used to test the battery’s performance… Click here to see the full-sized diagram.

ph5 cycle test setup diagram

 

Voltage vs. load current

As expected, the voltage output of the PH5 remains quite stable, up until roughly 2.1 amps where the voltage sags noticeably until the regulator goes into overcurrent protection mode.

A maximum load capacity of 2.1 amps seems to be a bit… limiting. That said, I have not done tests on the PH5’s transient load capacity, as it would require more automated control than what I currently have available.

Another issue with having such a flat discharge curve is that any device that performs fuel gauging using voltage alone will report 100% capacity, until it suddenly shuts down. This could be a big problem for digital camera users, as they will have no indication that their batteries are running low, until the device abruptly stops working. If the camera was writing an image to its memory card when the battery died, it could cause the image to be corrupted, or worse, damage the file system on the card!

Voltage vs. state-of-charge

Unless you are running the battery at a high discharge rate, the output voltage will be flat at 1.5 volts before abruptly brickwalling and dropping to zero immediately at the end of discharge. At a high load (in the case of the graph below, at 2 amps), the voltage remains flat until the very end of the discharge cycle (99% depth of discharge for my test run), where it quickly tapers off and drops to zero.

Capacity vs. load

This is the big one, and it took a lot of work to get this data, especially at low loads (48+ hours of continuous logging is just asking for Murphy’s Law to come into play). I used almost 50 discharge runs to create the graph below.

This is where things get… interesting. I was expecting the capacity to peak at low currents then taper off as the load current increases. Instead, I noticed a definite ‘hump’ in capacity around the 250 mA mark (reaching a maximum of 1700 mAh / 2550 mWh), and only after that point did I see the expected downward slope in capacity, reaching 1200 mAh (1800 mWh) at the 2 amp mark.

This data brings forth some very interesting conclusions. The PH5’s capacity is inferior to its Ni-MH counterparts (even the relatively crappy ones), and at higher discharge rates it has similar capacity to that of an alkaline at the same load, albeit with much better voltage stability than the Ni-MH or alkaline chemistries.

Other findings

Although I won’t go into too much detail for the next few points (I haven’t gotten quite enough data to be presentable), there are some other issues with the battery that I think should still be mentioned.

One issue is the amount of heat the battery gives off at high loads. At 2.1 amps, I had to use a fan to blow cool air onto the DC-DC converter just to prevent it from entering its over-temperature shutdown mode. Although the converter itself can tolerate elevated temperatures, the Li-ion cell inside will not; the uneven heating that the cell will encounter could potentially degrade its lifespan in the long run.

Another problem is efficiency. At 1 amp, the DC-DC converter is about 75% efficient, and is only 65% efficient at 2 amps. I have not tested the converter’s efficiency at lower loads yet, but I doubt it will achieve more than 85-90% efficiency.

A potential issue with this battery is self-discharge. The buck converter remains active all the time, unless the converter or the Li-ion protection circuit enters a protective shutdown state. I have not had a chance to fully charge an unmodified battery in order to perform a long-term self-discharge test, but I will create another blog post for that, if/when the time comes. Update (May 3, 2018): See the top of the page for the link to the self-discharge test results.

Conclusion

Overall, I’m on the fence when it comes to this battery. Its innovative design does provide unparalleled voltage stability, but its low capacity even at moderate discharge rates dampens the fun significantly. Additionally, the 2.1 amp discharge limit could prove to be a bottleneck for some high-drain applications; this, coupled with the cell’s tendency to shut down abruptly when the internal cell runs empty could potentially cause file system corruption for digital cameras that have not been designed to handle such sudden power interruptions.

Also, the batteries are very costly. At about $10 per cell, you may want to think twice about replacing all your current disposable and rechargeable batteries with these newfangled Li-ion ones. Don’t forget the charger either, as a special charger is required to make contact with a recessed terminal on the top of the battery.

Overall, this cell is… interesting. Just don’t expect a miracle in a steel can.

Pros:

  • Excellent voltage stability, even at high loads
  • Li-ion chemistry allows for a very lightweight cell, even with the addition of a DC-DC converter
  • High output voltage could allow some devices to run more efficiently

Cons:

  • Low capacity – provides a mere 1200 mAh (1800 mWh) @ 2 amps, and up to 1700 mAh (2550 mWh) @ 250 mA (even alkaline batteries can do better than this)
  • Abrupt shutdown when the battery is overloaded, overheated, or over-discharged
  • Runs hot at high loads (and therefore is fairly inefficient)
  • 1.5 MHz converter and unshielded inductor can cause excessive EMI (electromagnetic interference) in sensitive devices
  • Expensive! Costs approximately $10/cell
  • Requires proprietary charger

Bottom Line: This is a niche product and should not be considered a universal replacement for alkaline or Ni-MH AA batteries.

Ramble: Fixstars’ 6TB SATA SSD – is it a thing?

If you know me personally, you’ll know that I absolutely love SSDs. Every PC I own has one, and I can’t stand to use a computer that runs off an HDD anymore. Naturally, when I read about a 6 TERABYTE SSD coming out, it piqued my curiosity.

Photo is owned by Fixstars and is not my property. Retrieved from http://www.fixstars.com/en/news/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/SSD-6000M.png

Official SSD-6000M promotional photo, taken from Fixstars’ press release

A Japanese company by the name of Fixstar has recently announced the world’s first 6TB SATA-based SSD. Although 2.5″ SSDs in such a capacity range already exist, they’re SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) based which limits them primarily to server/datacenter usage. According to Fixstars’ press release, their SSD-6000M supports sequential read speeds of 540 MB/s, and sequential write speeds of 520 MB/s, which is on par with most modern SATA III (6 Gbps) SSDs on the market today.

Concerns

However, after reading a bit online, I’m beginning to have some concerns about the drive’s real-world performance. One thing that is rather worrying is that the company has only mentioned sequential I/O speeds and has said nothing on random I/O or read/write latency; although SSDs do have much better sequential speeds than their mechanical spinning counterparts, they really shine when it comes to random I/O (which makes up much of a computer’s typical day-to-day usage). In the early, early days of SSDs, manufacturers cared only about sequential I/O and it resulted in some SSDs that were absolutely terrible when it came to random I/O (fun fact: I once had an early SSD, the Patriot PS-100, and its performance was so bad that it actually turned me off of SSDs for a few years, so I know how bad such unoptimized SSDs can perform).

Construction

The SSD appears to be made up of 52 eMMC (embedded MultiMediaCard) chips in a sort of RAID 0 configuration and an FPGA (field-programmable gate array) as the main controller. In layman’s terms, this SSD is literally made up of a bunch of SD cards “strapped” together with a chip so that it appears as one single drive. In that sense, one can make a similar solution using a board like this, which parallels multiple microSD cards to act as a single ‘SSD’.

Image retrieved from Amazon (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51y0QqWL5sL.jpg)

The consumer equivalent of the SSD-6000M: SD cards and a controller chip. You can even get them from Amazon.

Conclusion

I’m wary of how well this SSD is going to take off. It could end up being a tremendous success, but it’ll certainly be out of the reach of the consumer market – either by its potentially poor random I/O performance, or its price (apparently it will cost well over $6000 USD).

Mini-Ramble: Blog posting schedule is now running on Valve Time

Ergh, it’s been way too long since I’ve actually put out content on this blog. So many ideas and drafts, but none of them are even close to being publishable material. My apologies for dragging my heels for the past few months. :/

(FYI, the term “Valve Time” refers to a video game company whose release/development timelines are grossly understated, usually several times longer than the anticipated duration.)

Anyway, the Kentli PH5 analysis is still underway, as I’m doing low-load tests that can take over 24 hours to complete a single run (and many of them had glitches near the end, meaning that I had to throw out 72+ hours worth of data!), and I’m probably being too thorough with my analysis as I’ve yet to process efficiency and thermal effects at various load currents. I might just publish the analysis in two parts; the first being the overall capacity and output voltage at various loads; the second being all the efficiency/thermal effects data at different load levels.

I bought a Monster Digital OverDrive 128GB USB external “SSD” a couple months ago (spoiler alert: it’s just a flat USB thumbdrive that doesn’t perform like a ‘real’ SSD at all), and I still have barely started work on that blog post.

Same goes for the newer version of the Charging Essentials Tamper-Resistant USB wall outlet. The raw data is collected but the proper graphs haven’t even been done yet.

But before I get to the USB wall outlet, I still need to get a blog post done of this nifty little USB charger measurement tool I made using a TI fuel gauge chip.

The list goes on. I reeallllly gotta shift into high gear if I want to get any meaningful content out this year…

So, about that Kentli battery…

It’s been a while since I’ve posted about the Kentli PH5 battery, which is a Li-ion cell with an integrated 1.5-volt regulator, wrapped up in an AA-sized package. Although I haven’t written much about its performance yet, that doesn’t mean I haven’t been doing work on it. In fact, I’m sure I have never put so much work into a single blog post before!

The full analysis of the battery’s performance is not fully complete, but I’ll reveal some details of my test setup and what I’m currently working on:

Analysis

I’m doing a much more thorough analysis of this battery than I have done with any other one on this blog. I have created a second bq27541 fuel gauge board, but with the explicit goal of measuring the voltage, current, passed charge (mAh) and temperature of a given DC-DC converter. This way, I can measure the input and output of the DC-DC converter simultaneously, greatly enhancing the data I can collect.

These are the data points/attributes I am currently collecting:

  • Battery voltage sag at high load currents
  • Battery capacity over different load currents (it’s not constant!)
  • DC-DC efficiency, both at different load currents but also over a single discharge cycle
  • Temperature rise of the DC-DC converter at different loads, and also over a single discharge cycle
  • Changes in battery capacity and internal resistance over many charge cycles

I want to be as thorough as possible with my measurements, mostly because nobody else has done a detailed performance review of this rather unusual battery, but also partially because I want to challenge myself and see how much of a “real engineer” I can be (#JustHobbyistThings). 😛

Ramble: I really need to get more content on here…

Wow, it’s almost February and yet it only feels like the new year has just begun! That also means that I haven’t put out any new blog posts recently, and I need to change that.

Upcoming blog posts include:

  • Teardown of genuine, and “semi-fake” iPhone 6 and 6 Plus batteries
  • Creating a USB charger/power bank analysis tool with a bq27541 fuel gauge chip
  • Attempting (and failing) to directly connect the SanDisk Extreme USB 3.0 drive’s internal SSD to the SATA bus on my computer
  • Teardown and analysis of some Costco-purchased power banks

Ramble/WordPress auto-post time: 2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

Madison Square Garden can seat 20,000 people for a concert. This blog was viewed about 66,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Madison Square Garden, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

(Day 3 and 4 of 4) Mini-Ramble: Dallas! TI! Batteries!

Oh wow, already a week since the event finished; I need to get posts written up more often!

Anyway, the last 2 days of the event were pretty much information seminars with three separate ‘tracks’ with one of them being all about fuel gauges (you can guess which one I went to 🙂 ). They discussed the reasons that fuel gauging is so important (and why “just measure the voltage” usually isn’t good enough), and also explained why your battery life just plummets after a few hundred cycles or 20% wear.

One of the main fuel gauge guys at TI gave me an evaluation board for their latest-and-greatest fuel gauge, the bq40z50. This gauge is able to handle 1-4 cells in series, which means that you can now pack a laptop battery’s smarts into a battery meant for a smartphone or tablet.

I’d post more but these few posts were “Mini-Rambles” after all. I may post a few pictures later on.

(Day 2 of 4) Mini-Ramble: Dallas! TI! Batteries!

Today was the first day of the actual Texas Instruments Battery Management Systems event. To my surprise, a couple hundred of people showed up from TI employees, a lot of customers (representatives from various companies like Bose, Google, and many others), and me as well. 🙂

The first day was a basic but still detailed introduction to the inner workings of Li-Ion technology as well as its limitations, failure modes (the gas coming from a Li-Po [lithium-ion polymer] cell contains carbon monoxide, hydrogen and a bunch of other gases), with this leading towards battery fuel gauges and why just measuring the voltage is not enough to accurately determine how full a battery is.

The day ended with a lab showcasing TI’s new Gauge Development Kit (GDK), which, in layman’s terms, is a “battery lab on a board”. It includes PC communication hardware, an adjustable charger, adjustable load and an on-board fuel gauge (but it’s set to use an external fuel gauge by default). I even got a chance to talk the TI battery management team, and even had a dinner with a few key TI guys including the one who made THE design for the GDK.

(Day 1 of 4) Mini-Ramble: Dallas! TI! Batteries!

Woohoo, travel time! Today marks the first day in Dallas attending Texas Instruments’ Battery Management Systems deep-dive seminar. Okay, technically it doesn’t start until tomorrow, but that doesn’t mean today was any less exciting.

The flight from Calgary to Dallas wasn’t too eventful, besides a controller fault that required going back to the terminal to resolve, but trying to grab a SIM card to put in my phone was a whole other ordeal. Fry’s carries the card but doesn’t carry the refill PINs, and my Canadian credit card would not work both online and on the phone; it was only when I went to Best Buy to purchase a refill card with cash that I was finally able to get cellular phone and data access.

I was also given a tour of the main TI facility, and boy it is HUGE! As much as I would have loved to share images, I signed an agreement explicitly stating I cannot do so. However, I was able to see a bunch of the lab rooms, offices and demo stands showcasing various TI technologies at work, such as the ARM processors in the Nest thermostat, the DLP chips in pocket projectors, and so on. I even got to see many of the people in the TI Battery Management team in person, but because of the seminar running from Tuesday to Thursday, they were visibly too busy with work to have a chat.

Tomorrow marks the first instalment of the Battery Management Deep-Dive Training sessions. There is preliminary word that I may have an opportunity to speak in public for a couple minutes about the TI forums and why I’m here.

Ramble: Engineers and hackers – never the twain shall meet?

Note: This is a vent post more than anything, and as such it won’t have much relation to the other things I write. If you want to stick to my main content, feel free to skip this blog post.

Continue reading

Looking inside an iPhone 5 battery

In the wake of my previous teardowns of the iPhone 4 and 4S batteries, I went onto eBay and Amazon (realizing that they finally have Amazon Prime student rates up in Canada) and bought a few iPhone 5 and 5S batteries. Although I was primarily interested in trying to get the gas gauge information out of the batteries, I had a secondary reason. The Nexxtech Slim Power Bank (a subject of a separate blog post) uses a pair of 3.8-volt Li-ion polymer batteries, and they seemed to be be suspiciously similar in size to what is used in the iPhone 5. But enough of that, we’re here for the iPhone 5 battery in particular!

Battery Casing

The iPhone 5 battery measures 3.7 mm in thickness, 3.2 cm in width and 9.1 cm in length. This particular model, made by Sony, has a model ID of US373291H, with the six digits corresponding to the cell’s dimensions. This cell has a labeled capacity of 1440 mAh at a nominal 3.8 volts, with a maximum charge voltage of 4.3 volts. I tried to read the data matrix barcode on the cell but my barcode scanning app on my phone refused to recognize it. I might try to scan and sharpen the barcode later but it’s not something that’s of a high priority to me.

Battery Teardown and Pinout

The board itself is rather interesting. The protection MOSFETs used to switch the battery’s power are chip-scale packages and are glued down with epoxy, same with the gas gauge itself. This means that I can’t easily replace it with a rework station if the need arises. The board includes the gas gauge, thermistors, protection circuitry and still has room for a polyfuse for extra over-current protection.

iPhone 5 battery PCB layout

iPhone 5 battery PCB layout

The pinout of the iPhone 5 battery is pretty much the same as of the iPhone 4 and 4S. You have Pack-, NTC Thermistor, HDQ and Pack+. In this particular model of battery, the gas gauge is a bq27545 (labeled SN27545), but has basically the same feature set as the iPhone 4/4S’ bq27541. With this information, I soldered to the small terminals on the connector (the actual connectors for this battery haven’t arrived yet since it takes so long to receive items from China on eBay), and hooked it up to my trusty Texas Instruments EV2400 box.

iPhone 5 battery pinout

iPhone 5 battery pinout

Battery Data

iphone 5 firmware versionAnd once again, we’re presented with an obscure firmware revision. The latest bq27545-G1 firmware is only version 2.24, but this chip has version 3.10. After forcing GaugeStudio to accept this gauge as a -G1 version, we’re once again presented with a sealed chip. Let’s try to unseal it with the default key…

... aaaaand nope. No dice with 0x36720414, unlike last time.

Nope. No dice with 0x36720414, unlike last time.

… and I get the dreaded “Unseal Key” prompt. Cue the dramatic Darth Vader “NOOOOO” here. Maybe Apple read my previous post and decided to change the default keys this time (Hey Apple, if you read this, make the iPhone 6’s gas gauge have the default keys again)! This means that not only can I not access any of the juicy details of this battery, but I cannot update its firmware to a more… conventional version either. I could try brute-forcing it, but trying to hack a key with a 32-bit address space over a 7 kbps bus… uh, no. That’s not going to happen. I’d probably have better luck reverse-engineering Apple’s battery code but I doubt they have any facility to do in-system firmware updates for the gas gauge.

Data captured from GaugeStudio

Data captured from GaugeStudio

Now for some rather… interesting details of what we can access. The design capacity of this battery, according to the gas gauge, is 1430 mAh, same as the iPhone 4S and also 100 mAh less than what’s written on the label. That, and the full charge capacity of this battery is 1397 mAh out of the gate. The gauge seems to be an insomniac (it won’t enter Sleep mode even when the battery is not hooked up to any load), and it seems to have less features despite having a higher firmware version (I’m sure the internal temperature isn’t 131 degrees C…), and the Pack Configuration register doesn’t bring up any sensible data.

Battery… conspiracy?

One thing that I haven’t confirmed is whether or not this battery had been tampered with before I received it. I bought this particular battery from eBay and it was listed as new. It had some adhesive residue but no obvious sign of being peeled off from another iPhone. The cycle count is set to 1, and because the gas gauge is sealed, I can’t read any other data like the lifetime data logs. There is a chance that this battery isn’t new and that the seller had somehow changed the data memory and sealed the chip with a non-default key, but I need to wait until some other batteries arrive in the mail and perhaps try reading out batteries taken out directly from some iPhone 5s. Until then, it’s only speculation as to why this chip is sealed with a different key.

The next victims specimens: an iPhone 5S battery, a “new” iPhone 4 battery, and an Amazon Kindle battery.

Review, teardown and analysis of Charging Essentials USB wall outlet

(UPDATE: March 2, 2015 – I’ve picked up a pair of the newer tamper-resistant versions of this wall outlet. A review and teardown on that unit is coming up; stay tuned!)
(UPDATE 2: May 29, 2016 – Scratch that on the first tamper-resistant model; it had the same performance as the one mentioned here. Also, Costco has released a 3.1A version of this outlet, and is currently under review.)

About a week ago I bought a set of wall outlets from Costco that integrate two USB charging ports into a standard Decora-type receptacle. It’s marketed to replace your traditional AC adapter, allowing other appliances to be plugged in while charging your portable electronics.

The outlet is made by Omee Electrical Company, but curiously enough this particular model, the OM-USBII, wasn’t listed on their site. The packaging itself bears the name Charging Essentials, with a logo that looks like a USB icon that’s had one Viagra too many. The packaging states that the outlet has:

  • “Two 5VDC 2.1A ports for more efficient charging in less time”
  • “Smarter USB charging with special chip designed to recognize and optimize the charging requirements of your device”
  • “Screw-free wall plate snaps into place for a more clean, modern appearance”

The second note is of particular importance to me. If it’s true, that means it might be using some USB charge port controller like TI’s TPS251x-series chips. But I’m not one to have blind faith in what’s written on the packaging. Let’s rip this sucker apart!

The outlet has a snap-on coverplate which may look sleek but could hamper removal of this outlet later on if needed. I was curious as to why one couldn’t just use a regular screw-on coverplate, and it turns out it’s because the mounting flange doesn’t have any tapped screw holes; you physically can’t use screws on this because the manufacturer didn’t want to go to the effort to make holes that can accept screws!

The casing is held together with four triangle-head screws in a weak attempt to prevent opening of the device. I had a security bit set on hand so this posed no hindrance to me. Upon removing the cover, the outlet seems rather well built. However, after removing the main outlet portion to reveal the AC-DC adapter inside, I quickly rescinded that thought.

The converter seems relatively well-built (at least relative to some crap Chinese power supplies out there). Some thought was put into the safe operation of this device, but there’s almost no isolation between the high and low voltage sides, and the DC side of this adapter is not grounded; the “ground” for the USB ports floats at 60 volts AC with respect to the mains earth pin. The Samxon brand caps are also pretty disappointing.

As for the USB portion of this device, I had to remove some hot glue holding the panel in place. After a few minutes of picking away at the rubbery blob, I was able to pull out the USB ports.

… and I found LIES! DIRTY LIES! There is no USB charge port controller, contrary to what the packaging claims. It just uses a set of voltage dividers to emulate the Apple charger standard, which could break compatibility with some smartphones. Ugh, well let’s put it back together and take a look at it from the performance side of things. At least the USB ports feel pretty solid…

To measure the voltage-current characteristic of the outlet, I rebuilt my bq27510-G3 Li-Ion gas gauge board so it had better handling of high current without affecting my current and voltage measurements. The reason I used this is because the gauge combines a voltmeter and ammeter in one chip, and by using the GaugeStudio software, I could create easy, breezy, beautiful V-I graphs.

Using a Re:load 2 constant-current load, I slowly ramped up the load current while logging the voltage and current data to a CSV file for analysis in Excel.

overall vi graphThis charger’s… okay. It has surprisingly good regulation up to 2.3 amps, but after that point the AC-DC converter basically brickwalls and the voltage plummets to 3 volts. That said, this also means that this outlet is not a set of “two 2.1A USB ports”. You can charge one tablet but you won’t be able to charge a tablet along with another device simultaneously.

Bah, I’ve had it with this wall outlet. Looks like this one’s gonna be returned to Costco in the next few days. This outlet may be adequate for some people, but for me it’s a disappointment.

Pros:

  • Solid USB ports
  • Good voltage stability (up to 2.3 amps, enough to charge ONE tablet)
  • Apple device compatibility

Cons:

  • Annoying coverplate design
  • Does not meet rated current output, will not charge 2 tablets or 1 tablet + another device
  • Does NOT have a “smart charging chip” despite being stated on packaging, some devices (eg. BlackBerry) will refuse to charge from these ports
  • Power supply for USB seems cheap
  • USB port is not grounded – if a short-circuit happens inside the power supply it can be a shock hazard to you

Mini-Ramble: Upcoming posts

In lieu of any recent posts, I’d at least post what I plan to write in the near future:

  • Failure analysis of KitchenAid KICU509XBL induction cooktop
  • Teardown/analysis of XtremeMac InCharge power bank
  • Teardown/analysis of Nexxtech Slim Power Bank (3000 mAh)
  • Shoehorning a Nokia BL-5C into a Samsung Galaxy S II
  • Review of the Texas Instruments Gauge Development Kit (GDK) – it’s a beauty!
  • Create a tiny stereo audio amp that’s efficient enough to run off a coin cell!
  • Adding fuel gauges to devices that normally don’t have one (or at least provide some way to track capacity remaining in the battery)
  • Creating a digital music player, using only 7400 logic, some EPROM or NOR flash, and an oscillator. (might even post this one on HackADay 🙂 )
  • Plans for making Li-Ion gauge boards on Tindie
  • More solar panels

KitchenAid induction cooktop service manual

In preparation for a future post in which I do some failure analysis on my KitchenAid KICU509XBL induction cooktop, I dug up the service manual I had laying in one of my document drawers and have scanned it into a PDF. Download the PDF file here.

Since Googling for the cooktop’s error/failure codes didn’t turn up anything useful, I’ll post them here so that people can find it more easily (note that I’ve paraphrased it from what’s listed in the PDF itself):

Failure types:

  1. Power control board: Affects only one burner, with the rest remaining functional.
  2. Usually from the power control board, but could be some exceptions: Affects all burners associated with that control board, but any burners that aren’t using said board will still work.
  3. User interface board: Entire cooktop will be unusable.

Error codes:

  • F12: Type 1 – Insufficient current to a burner’s electromagnetic coil.
  • F21: Type 2 – Mains power supply frequency is out of range.
  • F25: Type 2 – Cooling fan is stuck or dead. The specific fan that has failed can be determined by which side the F25 error code is appearing on the user interface board.
  • F36, F37: Type 1 – A burner’s temperature sensor has failed.
  • F40: Type 1 or Type 2 – Power control board has failed.
  • F42: Type 2 – Mains power supply voltage has a problem, perhaps an open fuse on the EMI filter/mains input board.
  • F47: Type 2 – User interface board cannot communicate with the power control board, and/or its fuse is blown. (This failure code is what appeared on my particular cooktop.)
  • F56: Type 3 – The configuration data on the cooktop’s user interface board EEPROM is invalid.
  • F58: Type 2 – The configuration data on the cooktop’s power control board EEPROM is invalid.
  • F60: Type 3 – User interface board has failed.
  • F61: Type 2 – Power control board has failed, likely because it is not receiving enough voltage.
  • C81, C82: Type 2 – Cooktop is overheating.

EDIT (November 6, 2015): The F47 code, in my case, was because the power control board (which is responsible for driving the induction coils to heat up the cookware) had short-circuited somehow. Either way, it burnt out all of the transistors and the diode bridge, which then caused its fuse to blow, and at one point it tripped the main breaker in the house.

I suspect it was caused by using the largest element (the rear right burner) on the Boost/P setting, which overloaded the electronics and caused them to fail dramatically. After getting the board replaced (twice), KitchenAid said they do know about this issue to some extent, and repaired our cooktop free-of-charge despite being out of warranty for several months.

Mini-Ramble: Obligatory filler post

It’s been well over a month since my last post. Some upcoming posts are in progress but none of them are in a state that I’d want in order for them to be publishable.

Upcoming posts involve tearing apart yet another portable power pack, replacing laptop battery gauge chips and perhaps some other related posts if I get to documenting and photographing those works.

There’s no real ETA for these; work on this blog will resume once my depression decides to stop kicking me in the shins every day…

Ramble: Flappy Bird crash investigation

Although it’s already been pulled off the iOS App Store and the Google Play Store, I managed to get a copy of the .apk file and decided to play it on my phone. Seeing others’ experiences along with my own, I noticed there is a pattern to how the annoying little birds fly and crash.

Bird-control theory

The bird is controlled by tapping the screen, which causes the bird to move upward shortly before falling down again. Unlike other similar games, the screen needs to be periodically tapped to keep the bird in the air. This is basically pulse-density modulation at work; each tap of the screen causes a rise of a fixed amplitude and duration.

After playing over 200 rounds, I tabulated the data in a giant Excel spreadsheet, documenting the score along with how and where the bird crashed. With this data, I created a bunch of charts showing how and where crashes occur.

Charts

scorescrash typecrash locationscrash proximityBreakdown

From what I’ve collected, the majority of crashes are overshoots (the bird flies too high and hits the pipe), hitting the top pipe either to the left side or in the center. This can be attributed to the bird’s behavior when flying. When the screen is tapped, the bird moves a certain distance upwards but cannot be controlled. If the bird is too close to the pipe, an overshoot will occur and crash the bird.

I created a bunch of statistics in the spreadsheet outlining the most common crash IDs (explained in the picture) and score information (my highest was 34 🙂 )

statsWas this a good way to cure boredom? Probably, but also possibly a bit too much work given the premise of this game.

If you want a copy of the Excel spreadsheet, click the link below.

Flappy Bird Crash Data

Mini-Ramble: I’m one of TI’s Community Members of the Month!

Yesterday I received a nice little email from The Texas Instruments E2E Community team. I was chosen as their Member of the Month of their analog electronics forum, specifically the battery fuel gauge section (of course!).

CaptureTI is sending me a Fuel Tank BoosterPack for their Launchpad microcontroller development platforms. It includes a 1200 mAh lithium-polymer battery, a bq27510 fuel gauge, and a bq24210 lithium-ion charger, all on one board. They’ve also offered me the opportunity to write a post on their power management blog, Fully Charged, regarding this little board. When I receive it I’ll definitely be taking a closer look at it.

Thanks, Texas Instruments!

Mini-Ramble: I’m such an icon artist!

After working so much with these battery chips, I thought I should spice up the Windows file icon for the .gg files that clutter my documents folder.

I’m not a person for glossy icons, but I’m also not a fan of the super-flat colour scheme that the Windows Metro UI uses. I prefer the good old style of Windows 9x-esque icons (hey, it’s what I grew up on! 🙂 ), albeit with a more… contemporary colour scheme. Keep it simple!

Windows .ico file download: https://www.dropbox.com/s/u7kjb3og7ecvpsj/gas%20gauge%20file.ico

You can use Nirsoft’s FileTypesMan to add an icon in Windows. Personally, I configured it so that .gg files open up in Notepad++ for manual editing.